CAS Weekly 09/09/15

Image by Hugh Llewelyn

Image by Hugh Llewelyn

Modelling

UK Rail

World Rail

From The CAS Team

  • Edward hunts down the former life of Toton Yard.

Three Shades of Grey (Railfreight 1987 corporate identity, Roundel Design Group, UK)

Fantastic Article from The Beauty of Transport on BR Railfreight corporate identity.

The Beauty of Transport

On the wall of Britain’s National Railway Museum in York, you can find a display of what might be considered wall art, might be thought of as ingredients in a transport company’s corporate identity, or maybe considered neat graphic design turned into cast metal components. It’s all three, and here it is:

Depot plates at the National Railway Museum in 2013. From left to right, top to bottom; row one: Buxton, Eastfield and Knottingley; row two: Cardiff and Crewe Diesel; row three: Stewarts Lane, Stratford and Hither Green; row four: Immingham and Grangemouth; row five: Toton. There were further plates, not illustrated here. Photo by Paul Wright [used with permission] Depot plates at the National Railway Museum in 2013. From left to right, top to bottom; row one: Buxton, Eastfield and Knottingley; row two: Cardiff and Crewe Diesel; row three: Stewarts Lane, Stratford and Hither Green; row four: Immingham and Grangemouth; row five: Toton. There were further plates, not illustrated here. Photo by Paul Wright [used with permission]

These are depot plaques, cast aluminium plates which were part of the best British Rail corporate identity of them all. Each one represents a different Railfreight depot, using local history and motifs to inform their design.

So where were we the last time…

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Review: Bachmann Class 20 – GBRf and London Transport

A special double review for you today – two Bachmann Class 20’s!

Overview

Image by Dave Hitchborne

228 Class 20‘s were designed by English Electric and built between 1957 and 1968 in Newton and Darlington. They were initially intended to service light mixed freight work and were fitted with the English Electric’s 8 SVT Diesel engines capable of producing 1,000 horse power and a top speed of 75mph. For today’s standards the Class 20 is unusual in the fact it has a single cab at the rear of the loco giving the driver poor visibility in the ‘forward’ direction. Despite this, English Electric’s design proved more successful than their competitors of the time: Both the Class 15 and 16 by Thompson-Houston and North British Loco Company respectively featured off-set central cabs giving poor visibility in both directions; and although the Clayton Class 17’s (of which I reviewed last week) had better visibility, their reliability let them down. BR therefore continued to order the ever reliable class 20’s coupling them nose-to-nose in multiple to solve the visibility problem. This practice effectively gave you 2,000hp of tractive power enabling the 20’s to be utilised in heavier freight duties. Some were also retrofitted with train heating and were deployed on passenger routes in the Scottish Highlands.

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