071/270: #WhiteCity – The Right-Hand Drive

It’s certain that Seymour, Bilbow and McGill took a lot of their influence from similar Charles Holden structures on the Central Line when designing White City. Some of Holden’s signature features and principles are still plain to see, including the boxy brick facade with the high sided ticket hall window. However the 1930’s art deco embellishments of comparable Holdens are starting to wane and the austerity of post-war Britain is showing through. The individual window panes are much larger and therefore there are less of them. This no doubt allows the maximum amount of light into the ticket hall below and means less electric lighting is needed. The sweeping curved shop fronts found at say Bounds Green (009) have been abandoned for simplistic square office blocks. You can see the very transition from 1930’s art deco grandeur to 1950’s brutalism right here at White City. The powers of the time obviously agreed as the design won a Festival of Britain award.

Though a handful of station on the Underground have right-hand running, White City is the only above ground station to feature this non-standard arrangement. This dates back to the former Wood Lane loop on which the station is built, which allowed westbound terminating trains to run round and head back east without stopping for the driver to change ends.

Image copyright A Carter – CallingAllStations.co.uk

Station Index

070/270: #WoodLane – The Newest

In the reflection of the angled glass panes fronting the station facade, cranes work away in the background turning the BBC’s former home at Television Centre into “affordable” apartments. The whole area around Wood Lane is going through lengthy re-generation, and so we arrive at London Underground’s newest station, built to support the centrepiece of that very scheme – The Westfield shopping complex.

Opened in 2009 and designed by Ian Ritchie Architects, Wood Lane is definitely a product of its time with stainless-steel, granite and glass adorning every corner. The materials used give it the feel of a baby Canary Wharf (056).

Image copyright A Carter – CallingAllStations.co.uk

Station Index

069/270: #ShepherdsBushMarket – The Market

The walk between Goldhawk Road (068) and Shepherd’s Bush Market takes a mere 3 – 4 minutes even at a leisurely pace. Time then to appreciate the station’s namesake market, and the backdrop of the Metropolitan Railway viaduct behind. Despite us being in the west, it’s very much like a scene from Eastenders and has a certain idyllic-London quality to it.

Image copyright A Carter – CallingAllStations.co.uk

Station Index

068/270: #GoldhalkRoad – The Shack

The exotic sounding Goldhawk Road gets its name from the 14th century estate owner, John Goldhawk who presided over large quantities of land in this area.

The station was a later addition to the 1864 line being constructed in 1914. It was obviously never destined for greatness and the whole design has a very temporary halt like feel. The shelters and staircases are made from low hanging corrugated iron sheets and the ticket hall has been carved out of one of the viaduct arches. Perhaps it was never intended to stand the test of time, this after all is an area with an ever-changing railway landscape.

Goldhawk Road is so minimal that even its Wikipedea page is forced to talk about what sort of coinage the ticket machine will and wont accept, just to pad the article out a bit…

Image copyright A Carter – CallingAllStations.co.uk

Station Index