Side Tracked: The Forgotten Strike

UPDATE 15:06pm: It is confirmed both unions have suspended strikes this week.

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UPDATE 12:17pm: Shortly after publishing this, one of the unions taking part in the strike (TSSA) have agreed to call off the walk-out planned for 21:30 tonight. It is unclear at the moment whether RMT have also agreed to call off their strike. If they have – it is almost certain the bellow Revenue Strike will also not go ahead. It’s still worth a read though..

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The tube strikes last week, and the 2nd set planned for tonight, have been widely covered by the media. The strikes have caused transport misery in the capital this February with commuters queuing hours for buses and forcing swathes of people to walk to their destinations. Some reports however suggest lines were running near empty services as customers deserted the tube in large numbers.

In conjunction with the station staff walk-out there has been a 2nd, less well publicised, type of strike happening over the last two weeks.

It’s called a Revenue Strike and took place last Friday (7th) and yesterday (10th) and is planned to happen again this Friday (14th).

At certain times of the day RMT workers will open ticket gates, shut up ticket offices and machines and refuse to sell tickets or issue penalty fares. So what does that mean? Free ride right? Well I certainly wouldn’t be condoning that would I… but the information and details of when ticket gates will be opened can be found here on the 2nd page of this official RMT strike leaflet.

https://i2.wp.com/www.london-se1.co.uk/news/imageuploads/1231849739_80.177.117.97.jpg

Customers would still be encouraged to tap in at the start of their journey incase the gates are not open at the end of their journey for whatever reason. (Remember not everyone is in the unions). You could always claim that nobody was able to sell you a ticket be it paper or oyster top up.

With the general public struggling to back the strike this may be a type of walk-out that generates more support with commuters. Especially as such a small amount of union members turned out to vote in the strikes.

– Andy Carter

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